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A last resort? A scoping review of patient and healthcare worker attitudes toward strike action

A last resort? A scoping review of patient and healthcare worker attitudes toward strike action

Essex, Ryan ORCID: 0000-0003-3497-3137, Burns, Calvin ORCID: 0000-0002-5435-3114, Evans, Thomas ORCID: 0000-0002-6670-0718, Hudson, Georgina, Parsons, Austin and Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265 (2022) A last resort? A scoping review of patient and healthcare worker attitudes toward strike action. Nursing Inquiry:e12535. pp. 1-10. ISSN 1320-7881 (Print), 1440-1800 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/nin.12535)

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Abstract

While strike action has been common since the industrial revolution, it often invokes a passionate and polarising response, from the strikers themselves, from employers, governments and the general public. Support or lack thereof from health workers and the general public is an important consideration in the justification of strike action. This systematic review sought to examine the impact of strike action on patient and clinician attitudes; specifically to explore 1) patient and health worker support for strike action and 2) the predictors for supporting strike action and the reasons given for engaging in strike action. A systematic scoping review was employed to identify all relevant literature, followed by a textual narrative synthesis. A total of 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Support for strike action was largely context dependent. A range of factors impact support for strike action; broader cultural and structural factors, such as unionisation and general acceptance of strike action; systemic factors, such as the nature of the healthcare system, including infrastructure and work conditions; the strike itself; and a range of individual factors, the most notable of which was being a student or in an early career stage. There were also some surprising results, for example during a doctors strike nurses were provided with the opportunity to expand their role, which led to greater professional autonomy and job satisfaction.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: strike; protest; health; healthcare
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Chronic Illness and Ageing
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Health Sciences (HEA)
Last Modified: 24 Nov 2022 17:05
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/37516

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