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Exploring the concept of non-violent resistance amongst healthcare workers

Exploring the concept of non-violent resistance amongst healthcare workers

Essex, Ryan ORCID: 0000-0003-3497-3137, Aked, Hil, Daniels, Rebecca, Newton, Paul ORCID: 0000-0002-8525-6763 and Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265 (2022) Exploring the concept of non-violent resistance amongst healthcare workers. Nursing Ethics. ISSN 0969-7330 (Print), 1477-0989 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/09697330221122904)

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Abstract

Background: Non-violent resistance which has involved healthcare workers has been instrumental in securing a number of health-related gains and a force in opposing threats to health. Despite this, we know little about healthcare workers who have engaged in acts of non-violent resistance.
Research aim: Amongst a sample of healthcare workers who had engaged in acts of resistance this study sought to explore their understanding of non-violent resistance and how or whether they felt healthcare workers made a distinct contribution to such action.
Research design: Cross-sectional survey
Participants and research context: Healthcare workers (doctors, nurses, academics and others) from the UK and Europe who had engaged in acts of non-violent resistance.
Ethical considerations: Ethical approval for this study was granted by the University of Greenwich Human Research Ethics Committee (UREC/20.5.6.11).
Findings/results: Most participants spoke about the nature of non-violent resistance, its oppositional, didactic and symbolic functions and the role of violence or harm. While most people understood non-violent resistance as a public, oppositional and collective act, many identified more subtle everyday acts in the workplace that undermined policy or procedures they saw as harmful. When asked about distinctions in non-violent resistance carried out by healthcare workers, most participants referred to their standing in society, noting that healthcare works were a trusted and authoritative source. Some identified an ethical imperative to act while others identified the risks that came with such action, noting their accountability and responsibility they had to patients. About a quarter of participants felt that such action was no different to others carrying out non-violent resistance or dependent on the issue or nature of the action.
Conclusions: These findings speak to the complex and multifaceted nature of non-violent resistance. Additionally our findings suggest healthcare workers have a distinct role to play in leading and supporting non-violent actions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: protest; resistance; non-violent resistance; healthcare; healthcare workers; ethics
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HX Socialism. Communism. Anarchism
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Chronic Illness and Ageing
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Health Sciences (HEA)
Last Modified: 25 Nov 2022 13:01
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/37480

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