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The Circle of Security Parenting Program (COS-P): a randomized controlled trial of a low intensity, individualized attachment-based program with at-risk caregivers

The Circle of Security Parenting Program (COS-P): a randomized controlled trial of a low intensity, individualized attachment-based program with at-risk caregivers

Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J, Rudolph, Julia ORCID: 0000-0003-4878-3537, Edwards, Elia-Jade, Swan, Kellie, Campbell, Shawna M, Hawes, Tanya and Webb, Haley (2021) The Circle of Security Parenting Program (COS-P): a randomized controlled trial of a low intensity, individualized attachment-based program with at-risk caregivers. Behavior Therapy, 53 (2). pp. 208-223. ISSN 0005-7894 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2021.07.003)

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Abstract

The Circle of Security–Parenting Intervention (COS-P; Cooper et al., 2009) is a psychoeducational program for caregivers of young children that has been widely disseminated. The program is founded in attachment theory and relies on computer-delivered content and parent reflection and discussion to teach concepts of safety and security to promote better caregiver-child relationships and child wellbeing. The present study is a randomized controlled trial of COS-P, individually delivered to 85 Australian caregivers (51 COS-P, 34 waitlist control) who reported parenting distress and child disruptive behaviors. Caregivers completed a baseline assessment and repeated the assessment after completion of COS-P or 8 weeks on the waitlist. Caregivers completed surveys to report child symptoms, and parenting stress, anxious and avoidant attachment, reflective functioning, parenting practices, and depressive symptoms. No differences in COS-P vs. waitlist participants were found at baseline. Analyses of complete data (35 COS-P, 25-26 waitlist) revealed a greater decline in caregivers’ attachment anxiety and negative parenting relative to waitlist, but only attachment anxiety in intent-to-treat analyses. Other improvements were found, but these extended to both the COS-P and waitlist conditions and did not differ between conditions. Overall, effects of COS-P were small and rarely significant, suggesting the need to consider alternative programs that have evidence of effectiveness when providing services to at-risk families.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: parenting; Circle of Security; externalizing behaviors; stress; reflective functioning
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Human Sciences (HUM)
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2022 08:26
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/37013

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