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Recall of sexual abuse prevention education at school and home: Associations with sexual abuse experience, disclosure, protective parenting, and knowledge

Recall of sexual abuse prevention education at school and home: Associations with sexual abuse experience, disclosure, protective parenting, and knowledge

Rudolph, Julia ORCID: 0000-0003-4878-3537, Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J and Walsh, Kerryann (2022) Recall of sexual abuse prevention education at school and home: Associations with sexual abuse experience, disclosure, protective parenting, and knowledge. Child Abuse and Neglect, 129:105680. ISSN 0145-2134 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2022.105680)

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Abstract

Background: Child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention is dominated by a focus on child education. However, evidence that this education reduces CSA risk is limited and mixed. Objective: We investigated whether participants’ history of receiving school-based child sexual abuse prevention (CSAPP) was associated with experiencing CSA. Uniquely, we also investigated whether parent-led CSA education (PLSAE) and received protective parenting were associated with CSA. CSA knowledge was also considered. Methods: Australian university students (N = 1,265, Mage = 22.8, SD = 7.7, Moage = 18, Mdage = 20, 75% female) reported their history of CSAPP and PLSAE, experience of CSA, disclosure of CSA, parenting, and CSA knowledge. Results: CSAPP attendance was reported by 29% of respondents, 72% reported PLSAE, and 24% reported CSA. PLSAE was significantly associated with lower risk of CSA, but was CSAPP attendance was not. PLSAE was significantly associated with higher levels of parental involvement/care and monitoring/supervision. In a multivariate logistic regression model, involvement/care and monitoring/supervision were associated with lower risk of CSA, but PLSAE was not. Neither CSAPP attendance nor PLSAE was associated with CSA disclosure or CSA knowledge. Conclusions: These findings add to the small body of literature using reports of real-life experiences. Results call into question the over-reliance of child-education in CSA prevention and highlight the role of protective parenting. Building parenting capacity to include parenting practices is most likely to be effective for CSA prevention, such as monitoring and involvement, and should be included in CSA prevention efforts.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: CSA; sexual abuse prevention; protective behaviors; sexual abuse education; personal safety education; parenting
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Human Sciences (HUM)
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2022 08:03
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/37012

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