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A systematic review of rodent control as part of infectious disease control programs

A systematic review of rodent control as part of infectious disease control programs

Zeppelini, Caio Graco, Callefe, Joao Luiz Revolta, Coelho, Rachel, Silveira, Martha Silvia Martinez, Khalil, Hussein, Belmain, Steven R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545, Bertherat, Eric Gerard Georges, Begon, Michael and Costa, Federico (2022) A systematic review of rodent control as part of infectious disease control programs. International Journal of Pest Management. ISSN 0967-0874 (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/09670874.2022.2094491)

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Abstract

We investigated the empirical evidence supporting chemical rodent control as a public health program via a systematic search of the scientific databases PubMed and Web of Science, searching with term-strings for the concepts: “rodent control” and “zoonotic disease.” Retrieved results were screened by title and abstract to eliminate studies that (i) do not involve rodents, (ii) do not contain a zoonotic component, and (iii) involve rodents and zoonosis, but no rodent control. The remaining articles were read in full, eliminating studies that lack direct assessment of rodent control effects, with pre-/post-control measures of epidemiological outcomes. Overall, 957 entries were recovered, but only five passed all elimination criteria. Studies were concentrated in Iran, focusing on zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis control. The studies found significant effects on zoonotic incidence post-control, but achieved low scores in quality-of-report assessment. The effectiveness of chemical rodent control as a measure against a zoonotic disease is in its infancy, and more studies are necessary to allow an adequate assessment of the method. It is strongly recommended that future work in the subject should adopt standardized guidelines to report studies.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Rodent-borne zoonosis; public health; pest control; commensal rodents
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Last Modified: 08 Sep 2022 13:05
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/36990

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