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The amplifying effect of perceived group politicization: Effects of group perceptions and identification on anxiety and coping self‐efficacy among members of UK COVID‐19 mutual aid groups

The amplifying effect of perceived group politicization: Effects of group perceptions and identification on anxiety and coping self‐efficacy among members of UK COVID‐19 mutual aid groups

O'Dwyer, Emma ORCID: 0000-0003-1226-0515, Beascoechea-Segui, Neus and Silva Souza, Luiz Gustavo (2021) The amplifying effect of perceived group politicization: Effects of group perceptions and identification on anxiety and coping self‐efficacy among members of UK COVID‐19 mutual aid groups. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 32 (3). pp. 423-437. ISSN 1052-9284 (Print), 1099-1298 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/casp.2582)

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Abstract

Mutual aid groups developed and mobilized in communities across the UK and globally at the outset of the pandemic in order to support vulnerable community members with practical assistance and emotional support, with some understanding their work in political terms. This study adopted a “social cure” lens to investigate the effects of group identification and group perceptions on anxiety and coping self-efficacy among members of UK Covid-19 mutual aid groups. Survey data were collected from self-identified members of these groups (N = 844) during the initial period of “lockdown” restrictions in April – May 2020. Correlational analyses showed that identification with the mutual aid group was linked to more positive group perceptions and better self-reported psychological outcomes. Perceived group politicization showed the reverse pattern. Mixed support for the “social cure” model was evident; the effect of group identification on coping self-efficacy (but not anxiety) was serially mediated by perceived support and collective efficacy. Perceived group politicization was a significant moderator, seeming to amplify the indirect effect of group identification on coping self-efficacy via perceived support. Results are discussed in light of previous empirical work on the social cure and Covid-19 mutual aid groups. Please refer to the Supplementary Material section to find this article's Community and Social Impact Statement.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Covid-19; mutual aid; social cure; social identity; volunteering
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Inequalities
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Human Sciences (HUM)
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2022 13:22
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/36065

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