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Qualitative cost-benefit analysis of using pesticidal plants in smallholder crop protection

Qualitative cost-benefit analysis of using pesticidal plants in smallholder crop protection

Mkindi, Angela G., Coe, Richard, Stevenson, Philip ORCID: 0000-0002-0736-3619, Ndakidemi, Patrick A. and Belmain, Steven R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545 (2021) Qualitative cost-benefit analysis of using pesticidal plants in smallholder crop protection. Agriculture, 11 (12):1007. ISSN 2077-0472 (Print), 2077-0472 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11101007)

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Abstract

Assessing the potential drivers of farmers using pesticidal plants for crop protection is essential for wider adoption. However, few studies have focused on collaborative assessments of the underlying trade-offs when using pesticidal plant extracts for pest control. Smallholder farmers in northern Tanzania involved in farmer driven research assessing pesticidal plants evaluated the costs, benefits, trade-offs and areas for future investment. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic information from 77 farmers and their views on pest problems and crop protection in common bean production. This was followed by small focus group discussions (n = 9) using a participatory framework to elucidate the costs and benefits of adopting pesticidal plant technology. A multiple correspondence analysis showed that pesticidal plant use was associated with men greater than 50 years old, and synthetic pesticide use was associated with younger aged farmers and women. Farmers who used synthetics generally did not report the presence of common pest species found in common bean production, whereas farmers who used pesticidal plants were associated with more frequent reports of pest species. This participatory cost–benefit analysis highlighted that tools and processing challenges were the main costs to using pesticidal plants. The main benefit reported when using pesticidal plants was a general improvement to family health. Farmers expressed overall a positive outcome when using pesticidal plants for crop protection and recommended that future investments focus on improving access to tools and education regarding plant processing and extraction to improve uptake of the technology by smallholder farmers.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: pesticidal plants; smallholder farmers; Phaseolus vulgaris; pest management; qualitative cost benefit analysis
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2021 11:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/34138

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