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Black British female managers’ experiences of working for children and young people’s services

Black British female managers’ experiences of working for children and young people’s services

Miller, Denise A ORCID: 0000-0001-9947-0616 (2021) Black British female managers’ experiences of working for children and young people’s services. In: University of Greenwich Research Cafe, 23/03/2021, Online. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

White women (3%) are less likely to be unemployed than women from all other ethnic groups combined (7%) – ( January 2021)​

1 in 8 (12.1%) BME women working in the UK are employed in insecure jobs compared to 1 in 16 (6.4%) white women and 1 in 17 (5.5%) white men (TUC, 2020).​

BAME women suffer from cultural stereotyping by employers that results in them having to take jobs at a lower skills level than they are qualified for (TUC, 2016)​

A culture of bullying and stereotyping means BAME academics work harder and employ mentally draining strategies to try and get on (UCU, 2019).​

BAME applicants are half as likely to be successful in applications as their white peers; and women over-represented in low-paying sectors and underrepresented in Science, Technology, English and Maths (STEM) (Aldridge 2017).

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Other)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Black British Female Managers’ Perception Racism
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
L Education > L Education (General)
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2021 09:41
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/34021

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