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Considering climate and conflict conditions together to improve interventions that prevent child acute malnutrition

Considering climate and conflict conditions together to improve interventions that prevent child acute malnutrition

Brown, Molly ORCID: 0000-0001-7384-3314, Grace, Kathryn, Billing, Trey and Backer, David (2021) Considering climate and conflict conditions together to improve interventions that prevent child acute malnutrition. The Lancet Planetary Health, 5 (9). e654-e658. ISSN 2542-5196 (Print), 2542-5196 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/S2542-5196(21)00197-2)

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Abstract

Despite early warning signs about threats to food security, humanitarian interventions often lag behind these warning signs. Climate and conflict conditions are among the most important factors preceding food system failures and malnutrition crises around the world. Research shows how conflict and climate conditions can upend functional food and economic systems, but this research does not address the severe health impacts of these conditions on infants and young children. Translating quantitative research findings into humanitarian interventions requires geographical detail, resulting in location-specific alerts of risks of food insecurity. We describe how the use of readily available, spatially referenced quantitative data can support targeted interventions for nutrition resiliency. Effective humanitarian programmes for targeted nutrition interventions require real-time datasets on food security drivers and models that can provide actionable guidance to mitigate negative impacts of conflict and climate conditions on the people most susceptible to food insecurity. Although treatment of acute malnutrition is important, treating existing malnutrition is not enough. Instead, action to prevent acute malnutrition should be taken to minimise suffering and to maximise wellbeing, particularly in contexts prone to worsening climate and conflict conditions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: climate impacts, conflict, humanitarian programming, interventions, nutrition, modeling
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Faculty / School / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2021 12:36
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/33764

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