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Impact of low volume velocity-controlled vs. repetition to failure resistance training session on measures of explosive performance in a team of adolescents basketball players

Impact of low volume velocity-controlled vs. repetition to failure resistance training session on measures of explosive performance in a team of adolescents basketball players

Kalmus, Ott-Eric, Viru, Mehis, Alvar, Brent and Naclerio, Fernando ORCID: 0000-0001-7405-4894 (2021) Impact of low volume velocity-controlled vs. repetition to failure resistance training session on measures of explosive performance in a team of adolescents basketball players. Sports, 9 (8):115. ISSN 2075-4663 (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9080115)

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Abstract

This study examined the short-term effects (post 6 h and 24 h) of two equated (70% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM)) low volume resistance exercise protocols: (i) velocity-controlled (VC) and (ii) repetition to failure (RTF) on upper and lower body performance in competitive adolescent male basketball players. Following a randomized, counterbalanced design, ten participants (age: 16 ± 0.5 year) completed either VC or RTF separated by 72 h. VC consisted of 4 sets of 5 explosive repetitions (≥90% of the maximum velocity). RTF involved 2 sets of 10RM (with no velocity control). Measurements of 20-m sprint, countermovement jump (CMJ) and medicine ball toss (MBT) were collected before (baseline), post 6 h and 24 h after either VC or RTF. Increases of CMJ post 6 h (VC, +6.7%; RTF, +2.4%) and MBT post 24 h (VC, +4.6%; RTF, +4.2%) were observed after both VC and RTF. Only VC potentiated CMJ after 24 h (+2.0 ± 2.3%). No other changes or differences between protocols were observed. Performing a low volume exercise protocol, either VC or RTF, induced similar potentiation effects on the vertical jump (post 6 h) and medicine ball toss (post 24 h) in adolescent basketball players. Only the VC protocol was still effective to potentiate CMJ performance after 24 h.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: velocity-based training, post-activation potentiation, team-sport, vertical jump
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Human Sciences (HUM)
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2021 04:45
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/33655

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