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Cattle tick control in Africa: challenges with synthetic acaricides and potential of ethnoveterinary plants

Cattle tick control in Africa: challenges with synthetic acaricides and potential of ethnoveterinary plants

Mvumi, B. M., Nyahangare, E. T., Eloff, J. N., Belmain, S. R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545 and Stevenson, P. C. ORCID: 0000-0002-0736-3619 (2021) Cattle tick control in Africa: challenges with synthetic acaricides and potential of ethnoveterinary plants. CAB Reviews, 16:42. ISSN 1749-8848 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1079/pavsnnr202116042)

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Abstract

Cattle are a livelihood asset to smallholder farmers in Africa yet remain threatened by the effects of ticks and tick-borne diseases during production because they cause morbidity and premature death. The use of indigenous plants in tick control is a worldwide practice spanning thousands of years. Changes in the agricultural and socio-cultural landscape over time have, however, led to neglect of indigenous pesticidal plants in favour of synthetic products. The benefits of synthetic acaricides are well-recognized, but emerging observation indicates that they cannot solve all livestock health problems across production systems, farmer circumstances and agro-ecologies. Concerns associated with commercial acaricides have revived research interest in alternative or complementary remedies. Past research has focused on documenting ethnoveterinary practices, scientific validation of the practices and optimization of these practices. Here, we review the challenges of synthetic acaricides and progress made in ethnoveterinary plant research and development in Africa. The review highlights challenges of access, affordability and availability of commercial acaricides to resource-poor communities; synthetic acaricide resistance development; disposal of obsolete acaricides and environmental pollution; reduced water supply and implications on conventional use of acaricide-treated dipping facilities; and plant bioprospecting and downstream development of products in Africa. This information contributes towards shaping the ethnoveterinary plant research agenda and policy, and investment interventions in Africa.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: anti-tick plants, acaricidal plants, plant bioprospecting, ethnobotanical IPR, primary animal health care, botanical acaricides
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Chemical Ecology Research Group
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2021 12:12
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/33595

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