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Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli from fresh produce sold by street vendors in South African informal settlements

Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli from fresh produce sold by street vendors in South African informal settlements

Baloyi, Tintswalo, Duvenage, Stacey ORCID: 0000-0002-5984-1491, Du Plessis, Erika ORCID: 0000-0002-5582-1434, Villamizar-Rodríguez, Germán ORCID: 0000-0002-3558-0573 and Korsten, Lise ORCID: 0000-0003-0232-7659 (2021) Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli from fresh produce sold by street vendors in South African informal settlements. International Journal of Environmental Health Research. pp. 1-16. ISSN 0960-3123 (Print), 1369-1619 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/09603123.2021.1896681)

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli on informally sold fresh produce in South Africa, who harbour and express antimicrobial resistance genes and therefore pose indirect risks to public health. The majority (85.71%) of E. coli isolates from spinach, apples, carrots, cabbage and tomatoes, were multidrug resistant (MDR). Resistance to Aminoglycoside (94.81%), Cephalosporin (93.51%), Penicillin (93.51%) and Chloramphenicol (87.01%) antibiotic classes were most prevalent. Antibiotic resistance genes detected included blaTEM (89.29%), tetA (82.14%), tetB (53.57%), tetL (46.43%), sulI (41.07%), sulII (51.79%), aadA1a (58.93%) and strAB (51.79%). A single isolate was found to harbour eae virulence factor. Moreover, E. coli isolates were grouped into the intra-intestinal infectious phylogenetic group E (28.57%), the rare group C (26.79%), the generalist group B1 (21.43%) and the human commensal group A (16.07%). Presence of MDR E. coli represents a transmission route and significant human health risk.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Antimicrobial resistance; antimicrobial resistance genes; phylogenetic grouping; diarrheagenic virulence genes
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2021 12:31
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/33530

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