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Investigating antecedents of Islamophobia: the role of perceived control over terrorism, threat, meta-dehumanization, and dehumanization

Investigating antecedents of Islamophobia: the role of perceived control over terrorism, threat, meta-dehumanization, and dehumanization

Pavetich, Melissa and Stathi, Sofia ORCID: 0000-0002-1218-5239 (2021) Investigating antecedents of Islamophobia: the role of perceived control over terrorism, threat, meta-dehumanization, and dehumanization. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 31 (4). pp. 369-382. ISSN 10529284 (Print), 10991298 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/casp.2512)

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Abstract

Meta-dehumanization contributes to a vicious cycle of hostility. This study extends the literature by investigating antecedents and outcomes of meta-dehumanization in the context of Muslim–non-Muslim relations. Specifically, control over terrorism (COT) and threat were tested as predictors of meta-dehumanization among non-Muslim British nationals (N = 313). The results revealed that lower perceptions of COT predicted increased threat, which in turn predicted meta-dehumanization. Meta-dehumanization, consequently, predicted Islamophobia via increased dehumanization of Muslim people. The results were significant while controlling for political orientation and intergroup contact. This research highlights the unsettling cycle of meta-dehumanization and intergroup hostility. Theoretical and practical implications of this research are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: control, dehumanization, Islamophobia, meta-dehumanization, threat
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Inequalities
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2021 14:31
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/33119

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