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Estimation of peak vertical velocity and relative load changes by subjective measures in weightlifting movements

Estimation of peak vertical velocity and relative load changes by subjective measures in weightlifting movements

Chapman, Mark, Tomkins, Samuel, Triplett, Travis N, Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko and Naclerio, Fernando ORCID: 0000-0001-7405-4894 (2021) Estimation of peak vertical velocity and relative load changes by subjective measures in weightlifting movements. Biology of Sport, 39 (3). pp. 639-646. ISSN 0860-021X (Print), 2083-1862 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.5114/biolsport.2022.106156)

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the ability of the OMNI-RES (0-10) scale to estimate velocity and loading changes during sets to failure in the hang power clean (HPC) exercise.

Material and Methods: Eleven recreationally resistance-trained males (28.5±3.5 years) with an average onerepetition maximum (1RM) value of 1.1±0.07 kg body mass-1 in HPC, were assessed on five separate days with 48 hours of rest between sessions. After determining the 1RM value, participants performed four sets to self-determined failure with the following relative load ranges: 60%<70%, 70<80%, 80<90% and >90%. The peak vertical velocity (PVV), and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were measured for every repetition of each set.

Results: The RPE expressed after the first repetition (RPE-1) and when the highest value of PVV was achieved during the set (RPE-max) were similar and significantly lower than the RPE associated with a 5% (RPE-5%) and 10% (RPE-10%) drop in PVV. In addition, the RPE produced at failure was similar to RPE-5% only for the heaviest range (≥90%). Furthermore, RPE-1 was useful to distinguish loading zones between the four assessed ranges (60<70, vs. 70<80%, vs. 80<90%, vs. ≥90%).

Conclusions: The RPE seems to be useful to identify PVV changes (maximal, 5% and 10% drop) during continuous sets to self-determined failure and to distinguish 10% loading zone increments, from 60 to 100% of 1RM in the HPC.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: OMNI-RES (0-10) scale, perceived exertion, hang power clean, velocity-based training
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > School of Human Sciences (HUM)
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2021 08:05
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/32806

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