Skip navigation

Lost control driving home: A dual-pathway model of self-control work demands and commuter driving

Lost control driving home: A dual-pathway model of self-control work demands and commuter driving

Clinton, Michael E. ORCID: 0000-0001-8390-6278, Hewett, Rebecca, Conway, Neil and Poulter, Damian ORCID: 0000-0003-2521-5959 (2021) Lost control driving home: A dual-pathway model of self-control work demands and commuter driving. Journal of Management. ISSN 0149-2063 (Print), 1557-1211 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206321997912)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Publisher's PDF - Open Access)
32666 POULTER_Lost_Control_Driving_Home_(OA)_2021.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (350kB) | Preview
[img] PDF (Publisher Acceptance Email)
JoM acceptance email.pdf - Additional Metadata
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (126kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

This research contributes to theory on self-control at work through applying and extending the limited-capacity model of self-control to examine the extent to which daily self-control work demands predict self-control failure and driving behavior during the commute after work. We develop a dual-pathway model in which resisting-distractions demands and impulse-control demands at work have unique relationships with speeding behavior via two separate pathways of self-control failure: one reflecting a failure to regulate attention and the other reflecting a failure to suppress impulses, which is moderated by negative affect. In two studies of daily work experiences and driving behavior, we find support for our model, over and above the effects of cognitive and affective work demands, postwork fatigue, and motivation. We discuss the implications of our findings in relation to the concept of self-control work demands and self-control depletion theory. Our findings also contribute to research on the links between work and commuting, and driving commuting most specifically, which is important because work-to-driving spillover represents a substantive safety issue for organizations.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2021. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Uncontrolled Keywords: commuting, driving, self-control demands, self-control failure, diary study
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Thinking and Learning
Last Modified: 13 May 2021 22:04
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/32666

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics