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Lessons on enabling African smallholder farmers, especially women and youth, to benefit from sustainable agricultural intensification

Lessons on enabling African smallholder farmers, especially women and youth, to benefit from sustainable agricultural intensification

Haggar, Jeremy ORCID: 0000-0002-4682-4879 and Rodenburg, Jonne ORCID: 0000-0001-9059-9253 (2021) Lessons on enabling African smallholder farmers, especially women and youth, to benefit from sustainable agricultural intensification. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability. ISSN 1473-5903 (Print), 1747-762X (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/14735903.2021.1898179)

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Abstract

The papers in this Special Issue on what works and what is unlikely to work to enable poorer smallholders, especially women and youth, to benefit from Sustainable Agricultural Intensification (SAI) come from the Sustainable Agricultural Intensification Research and Learning programme. Three aspects of SAI are considered: (1) the equity of outcomes from SAI and how decisions to support equity can be better informed; (2) the social, economic and environmental trade-offs associated with SAI, how they are perceived and can be managed; and (3) how farmers access to services and information needed to implement SAI can be facilitated. Whether considering the gender and generational equities of participation in SAI or how trade-offs limit adoption of SAI, it is the local social, economic and environmental conditions that determine the outcome. We conclude that participation of local stakeholders in the adaptation of SAI to local social, economic and environmental conditions is critical to enabling poorer smallholders, women and youth to benefit from SAI. While some tools and processes are presented that may support this, there remains a challenge as to how such processes can be integrated into national policies and institutions.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way
Uncontrolled Keywords: equity, services, trade-offs, tools, extension services
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Ecosystem Services Research Group
Last Modified: 23 Apr 2021 22:59
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/32249

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