Skip navigation

Justice delayed? Internationalised criminal tribunals and peace-building in Lebanon, Bosnia and Cambodia

Justice delayed? Internationalised criminal tribunals and peace-building in Lebanon, Bosnia and Cambodia

Sriram, Chandra Lekha, Martin-Ortega, Olga ORCID: 0000-0002-1779-0120 and Herman, Johanna (2011) Justice delayed? Internationalised criminal tribunals and peace-building in Lebanon, Bosnia and Cambodia. Conflict, Security and Development, 11 (3). pp. 335-356. ISSN 1467-8802 (Print), 1478-1174 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/14678802.2011.593811)

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

In countries emerging from violent conflict and/or mass atrocity, there is an urgent need to promote stability and often also widespread demand for accountability for abuses which have taken place. Debate has raged among scholars and practitioners about whether justice should be sacrificed or delayed for the sake of peace, or should be promoted even if it is in the short term destabilising. In many countries emerging from conflict processes of accountability, or transitional justice processes, operate almost simultaneously alongside processes of peace-building such as disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration of ex-combatants, reform of the security sector and rule of law promotion, in the immediate aftermath of conflict. These can include domestic processes of truth-telling, prosecution, reparation and amnesty, or internationally promoted processes such as international criminal tribunals. They can also include internationalised criminal tribunals, which have mixed national–international staff. While scholarship has increasingly focused on the engagement between transitional justice and peace-building processes in the relatively near term, far less has examined the role of processes of accountability that follow conflict termination by a significant period of time, justice delayed. Drawing on recent fieldwork, the authors examine three internationalised criminal tribunals developed some 15 years after the termination of conflict in countries that experienced three very different types of conflict, conflict resolution and peace-building or reconstruction in Bosnia, Lebanon and Cambodia. They find that despite claims made by advocates for such institutions, such tribunals may only have limited impact on longer term peace-building and that the effects of flawed peace-building activities affect the operating environment of the tribunals.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: DDR, hybrid tribunals, post-conflict reconstruction, transitional justice
Subjects: K Law > KZ Law of Nations
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences
Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences > Business, Human Rights and the Environment Research Group (BHRE)
Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences > School of Law & Criminology (LAC)
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2021 21:52
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/31850

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item