Skip navigation

The microbiome mediates the interaction between predation and heavy metals

The microbiome mediates the interaction between predation and heavy metals

Sadeq, Shlair A., Mills, R.I. Lloyd ORCID: 0000-0002-5977-3986 and Beckerman, Andrew P. (2021) The microbiome mediates the interaction between predation and heavy metals. Science of the Total Environment, 775:145144. ISSN 0048-9697 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.145144)

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Gut microbiota communities are fundamental ecological components in the aquatic food web. Their potential to mediate how organisms respond to multiple environmental stressors remains understudied. Here we explored how manipulations of the gut microbiome of Daphnia pulex, a keystone species in aquatic communities, influenced life history (size at maturity, age at maturity, somatic growth rate and clutch size), morphology (induced defence) and body condition (lipid status deposits) responses to combined anthropogenic (copper) and natural (predation risk) stress. Data from a factorial experiment revealed that the effect of predation risk on traits was often mediated by copper (predation risk and copper interact). These patterns align with theory linking predation risk and copper contamination via digestive physiology. We also found that each stressor, and their combination, was associated with the same community composition of the D. pulex microbiome. However, antibiotic manipulation of the microbiome reversed 7/12 the trait responses across life history, morphology and body condition. This was associated with dramatically different communities to control conditions, with clear and unique patterns of microbiome community composition for each stressor and their combination. Our study revealed that microbiome community composition is highly correlated with the response of organisms to multiple, simultaneous stressors.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: daphnia, heavy metals, copper, predation, microbiome, life history
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Chemical Ecology Research Group
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2021 13:16
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/31400

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item