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Are super-face-recognisers also super-voice-recognisers? Evidence from cross-modal identification tasks

Are super-face-recognisers also super-voice-recognisers? Evidence from cross-modal identification tasks

Jenkins, Ryan, Tsermentseli, Stella, Monks, Claire ORCID: 0000-0003-2638-181X, Robertson, David, Stevenage, Sarah, Symons, Ashleigh and Davis, Josh P. ORCID: 0000-0003-0017-7159 (2021) Are super-face-recognisers also super-voice-recognisers? Evidence from cross-modal identification tasks. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 35 (3). pp. 590-605. ISSN 0888-4080 (Print), 1099-0720 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3813)

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Abstract

Individual differences in face identification ability range from prosopagnosia to super-recognition. The current study examined whether face identification ability predicts voice identification ability (participants: N = 529). Superior-face-identifiers (exceptional at face memory and matching), superior-face-recognisers (exceptional at face memory only), superior-face-matchers (exceptional face matchers only), and controls completed the Bangor Voice Matching Test, Glasgow Voice Memory Test, and a Famous Voice Recognition Test. Meeting predictions, those possessing exceptional face memory and matching skills outperformed typical-range face groups at voice memory and voice matching respectively. Proportionally more super-face-identifiers also achieved our super-voice-recogniser criteria on two or more tests. Underlying cross-modality (voices vs. faces) and cross-task (memory vs. perception) mechanisms may therefore drive superior performances. Dissociations between Glasgow Voice Memory Test voice and bell recognition also suggest voice-specific effects to match those found with faces. These findings have applied implications for policing, particularly in cases when only suspect voice clips are available.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Voice recognition. face recognition, super-recognisers, policing, individual differences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Thinking and Learning
Last Modified: 19 May 2021 00:17
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/31377

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