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Moral reasoning about aggressive behavior in relation to type of aggression, age, and gender in South Korean pupils

Moral reasoning about aggressive behavior in relation to type of aggression, age, and gender in South Korean pupils

Lee, Seung-Ha, Smith, Peter K. and Monks, Claire P. ORCID: 0000-0003-2638-181X (2021) Moral reasoning about aggressive behavior in relation to type of aggression, age, and gender in South Korean pupils. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (5):2288. ISSN 1661-7827 (Print), 1660-4601 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052288)

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Abstract

Studies of moral reasoning in relation to aggressive behaviors have paid limited attention to dif-ferent types of aggression, and have mainly been in western societies. We describe findings from a study of 157 children, aged 6 or 11 years, from two schools in South Korea. Using a cartoon sce-nario methodology, we assessed moral reasoning about eight types of aggression: verbal, physi-cal individual, physical group, social exclusion, rumor spreading, breaking one’s belongings, sending a nasty text via mobile phone and a nasty message/email via computer. Four aspects of moral reasoning were assessed: moral judgment, harmfulness, reason for judgment, and causal responsibility. Many significant differences by type of aggression were found, especially for so-cial exclusion (seen as less wrong and harmful, and more the victim’s responsibility), physical group aggression (seen as more wrong or harmful, and a matter of fairness especially in older children and boys), and cyber aggression (seen more as the aggressor’s responsibility). Older children gave more reasons based on welfare, and fewer ‘don’t know’ responses for reasons and attributions. Gender differences were relatively few, but girls did make more use of welfare in the moral reasoning domain. Findings are discussed in relation to previous research and the cultural context in South Korea.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: moral reasoning, aggression, South Korea, children
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Vulnerable Children and Families
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2021 10:36
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/31317

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