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Is there evidence for cross-domain congruency sequence effect? A replication of Kan et al. (2013)

Is there evidence for cross-domain congruency sequence effect? A replication of Kan et al. (2013)

Aczel, Balazs, Kovacs, Marton, Bognar, Miklos, Palfi, Bence, Hartanto, Andree, Onie, Sandersan, Tiong, Lucas E. and Evans, Thomas Rhys ORCID: 0000-0002-6670-0718 (2021) Is there evidence for cross-domain congruency sequence effect? A replication of Kan et al. (2013). Royal Society Open Science, 8 (3):191353. ISSN 2054-5703 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.191353)

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Abstract

Exploring the mechanisms of cognitive control is central to understanding how we control our behaviour. These mechanisms can be studied in conflict paradigms, which require the inhibition of irrelevant responses to perform the task. It has been suggested that in these tasks the detection of conflict enhances cognitive control resulting in improved conflict resolution of subsequent trials. If this is the case then this so-called congruency sequence effect can be expected to occur in cross-domain tasks. Previous research on the domain-generality of the effect presented inconsistent results. In this study, we provide a multi-site replication of three previous experiments of Kan et al. (2013) which test congruency sequence effect between very different domains: from a syntactic to a non-syntactic domain (Experiment 1), and from a perceptual to a verbal domain (Experiment 2 and 3). Despite all our efforts, we found only partial support for the claims of the original study. With a single exception, we could not replicate the original findings, the data remained inconclusive or went against the theoretical hypothesis.We discuss the compatibility of the results with alternative theoretical frameworks.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: cognitive control, congruency sequence effect, conflict adaptation, domain-generality, replication
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2021 16:15
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/31182

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