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Intercropping rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis) with sweet pepper (capsicum annum) reduces major pest population densities without impacting natural enemy populations

Intercropping rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis) with sweet pepper (capsicum annum) reduces major pest population densities without impacting natural enemy populations

Li, Xiao-wei, Lu, Xin-xin, Zhang, Zhi-jun, Huang, Jun, Zhang, Jin-ming, Wang, Li-kun, Hafeez, Muhammad, Fernandez-Grandon, G. Mandela ORCID: 0000-0002-2993-390X and Lu, Yao-bin (2021) Intercropping rosemary (rosmarinus officinalis) with sweet pepper (capsicum annum) reduces major pest population densities without impacting natural enemy populations. Insects, 12 (1):74. ISSN 2075-4450 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12010074)

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Abstract

Intercropping of aromatic plants provides an environmentally benign route to reducing pest damage in agroecosystems. However, the effect of intercropping on natural enemies, another element which may be vital to the success of an integrated pest management approach, varies in different intercropping systems. Rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae), has been reported to be repellent to many insect species. In this study, the impact of sweet pepper/rosemary intercropping on pest population suppression was evaluated under greenhouse conditions and the effect of rosemary intercropping on natural enemy population dynamics was investigated. The results showed that intercropping rosemary with sweet pepper significantly reduced the population densities of three major pest species on sweet pepper, Frankliniella intonsa, Myzus persicae, and Bemisia tabaci, but did not affect the population densities of their natural enemies, the predatory bug, Orius sauteri, or parasitoid, Encarsia formosa. Significant pest population suppression with no adverse effect on released natural enemy populations in the sweet pepper/rosemary intercropping system suggests this could be an approach for integrated pest management of greenhouse-cultivated sweet pepper. Our results highlight the potential of the integration of alternative pest control strategies to optimize sustainable pest control.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: biocontrol, natural enemies, intercropping, sustainable agriculture, integrated pest management
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Chemical Ecology Research Group
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2021 10:36
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/30948

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