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'Let me take care of you': what can healthcare learn from a high-end restaurant to improve the patient experience?

'Let me take care of you': what can healthcare learn from a high-end restaurant to improve the patient experience?

Korkiakangas, Terhi, Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265 and Kneebone, Roger (2021) 'Let me take care of you': what can healthcare learn from a high-end restaurant to improve the patient experience? Journal of Communication in Healthcare: Strategies, Media and Engagement in Global Health. ISSN 1753-8068 (Print), 1753-8076 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/17538068.2021.1877602)

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Abstract

Background:
The patient experience is associated with patient satisfaction and health outcomes, presenting a key challenge in healthcare. The objective of the study was to explore the principles of care in and beyond healthcare, namely in a three Michelin-starred restaurant, and consider what, if any, principles of care from the diners’ experience could be transferrable to healthcare.

Methods:
The principles of care were first explored as part of observational fieldwork in a healthcare day surgery unit and restaurant respectively, focusing on communication between the professionals and the patients or the diners. Care was subsequently explored in a series of public engagement events across the UK. The events used immersive simulation to recreate the healthcare and the dining experiences for the general public, and to stimulate discussion.

Results:
A thematic analysis of the engagement discussions identified overarching themes in how care was experienced in and through communication; “informed, not bombarded”, “conversation, not interrogation”, “environment is communication”, and “being met as a person”. The themes suggested how the participants in simulation felt about the care they received in real time and provided recommendations for improved clinical practice.

Conclusions:
While practice improvements in healthcare are challenging, the patient experience could be enhanced by learning relational aspects of care from other sectors, including the high-end restaurant industry that focuses on meeting persons’ needs. Simulation provides a new kind of opportunity to bring professionals and patients together for focused discussions, prompted by immersive experiences of care and communication.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: simulation, fat duck, care, experience, fine dining, outpatients, clinical care
Subjects: R Medicine > RT Nursing
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2021 08:21
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/30854

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