Skip navigation

Retrieval of a well-established skill is resistant to distraction: evidence from an implicit probabilistic sequence learning task

Retrieval of a well-established skill is resistant to distraction: evidence from an implicit probabilistic sequence learning task

Vékony, Teodora, Török, Lilla, Pedraza, Felipe, Schipper, Kate, Pleche, Claire, Tóth, Laszlo, Janacsek, Karolina ORCID: 0000-0001-7829-8220 and Nemeth, Dezso (2020) Retrieval of a well-established skill is resistant to distraction: evidence from an implicit probabilistic sequence learning task. PLoS ONE, 15 (12):e0243541. ISSN 1932-6203 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0243541)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Open Access Article)
30825 JANACSEK_Retrieval_Of_A_Well-established_Skill_Is_Resistant_To_Distraction_(OA)_2020.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The characteristics of acquiring new sequence information under dual-task situations have been extensively studied. A concurrent task has often been found to affect performance. In real life, however, we mostly perform a secondary task when the primary task is already well acquired. The effect of a secondary task on the ability to retrieve well-established sequence representations remains elusive. The present study investigates whether accessing well-acquired probabilistic sequence knowledge is affected by a concurrent task. Participants acquired non-adjacent regularities in an implicit probabilistic sequence learning task. After a 24-hour offline period, participants were tested on the same probabilistic sequence learning task under dual-task or single-task conditions. Here, we show that although the secondary task significantly prolonged the overall reaction times in the primary (sequence learning) task, access to the previously learned probabilistic representations remained intact. Our results highlight the importance of studying the dual-task effect not only in the learning phase but also during memory access to reveal the robustness of the acquired skill.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: skill learning, consolidation, statitical learning, dual task
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Thinking and Learning
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2021 11:12
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/30825

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics