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Speed or accuracy instructions during skill learning do not affect the acquired knowledge

Speed or accuracy instructions during skill learning do not affect the acquired knowledge

Vekony, Teodora, Marossy, Hanna, Must, Anita, Vecsei, Laszlo, Janacsek, Karolina ORCID: 0000-0001-7829-8220 and Nemeth, Dezso (2020) Speed or accuracy instructions during skill learning do not affect the acquired knowledge. Cerebral Cortex Communications, 1 (1):tgaa041. ISSN 2632-7376 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/texcom/tgaa041)

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Abstract

A crucial question in skill learning research is how instruction affects the performance or the underlying representations. Little is known about the effects of instructions on one critical aspect of skill learning, namely, picking-up statistical regularities. More specifically, the present study tests how prelearning speed or accuracy instructions affect the acquisition of non-adjacent second-order dependencies. We trained 2 groups of participants on an implicit probabilistic sequence learning task: one group focused on being fast and the other on being accurate. As expected, we detected a strong instruction effect: accuracy instruction resulted in a nearly errorless performance, and speed instruction caused short reaction times (RTs). Despite the differences in the average RTs and accuracy scores, we found a similar level of statistical learning performance in the training phase. After the training phase, we tested the 2 groups under the same instruction (focusing on both speed and accuracy), and they showed comparable performance, suggesting a similar level of underlying statistical representations. Our findings support that skill learning can result in robust representations, and they highlight that this form of knowledge may appear with almost errorless performance. Moreover, multiple sessions with different instructions enabled the separation of competence from performance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: implicit learning, instruction, probabilistic learning, speed-accuracy, statistical learning
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Thinking and Learning
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2021 15:23
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/30821

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