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Music and communication in the operating theatre

Music and communication in the operating theatre

Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265, Korkiakangas, T., Bezemer, J. and Kneebone, R. (2014) Music and communication in the operating theatre. In: RCN International Nursing Research Conference 2014: Book of Abstracts. Royal College of Nursing, p. 64. ISBN 978-1910066492

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Abstract

Background: Music is played in over 70% of surgical operations performed (Way et al. 2013). Noise levels in the operating theatre (OT) already exceed WHO (2004) recommendations. There is currently a divide in health care professional opinions with few studies conducted and no policies or guidance in place (Moris et al. 2012).

Aim: This study aims to address the use of music in the OT based on the effect it has on communication.

Methods: A study using ethnographic observation and video-recordings of teamwork in the OT was conducted between July 2012 and January 2013. Video recordings of 20 operations over a period of six months in two theatres were captured. A sub sample of the recordings were randomly selected, consisting of music and non-music playing cases. Participants included 4 consultant surgeons, 6 Registrar surgeons, 5 anaesthetists, 6 Operating Department Practitioner’s (ODP’s) and 10 nurses. Each case was logged using a request/response sequence identified through interactional analysis. Statistical and interactional analyses were performed.

Results: A total of 2537 request/response observations were documented. Repeated requests were 1.2% to 3.2% more likely to occur in cases playing music than those not with a p-value of <0.0001.

Discussion: The statistics reveal that there is a significant difference between the amount of times a request is repeated when music is playing compared to when it is not, thus indicating that music is a barrier to good communication. The in-depth interactional analysis provides insight into why this is happening such as team member’s not hearing initial requests as well as the extra time taken to respond and subsequent frustrations.

Conclusions: Further research is needed to gain a better understanding of the effect music has on communication. Discussions between clinicians, managers, patients and governing bodies should be encouraged in order for recommendations and guidance to be developed.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Title of Proceedings: RCN International Nursing Research Conference 2014: Book of Abstracts
Uncontrolled Keywords: communication, operating theatre, operating room, music
Subjects: R Medicine > RZ Other systems of medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
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Last Modified: 01 Feb 2021 20:58
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/30806

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