Skip navigation

SC15 ‘let me take care of you’: utilising simulation to bridge the gap between dining and healthcare, generating a wider discussion on what care should feel like

SC15 ‘let me take care of you’: utilising simulation to bridge the gap between dining and healthcare, generating a wider discussion on what care should feel like

Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265, Korkiakangas, Terhi and Kneebone, Roger (2018) SC15 ‘let me take care of you’: utilising simulation to bridge the gap between dining and healthcare, generating a wider discussion on what care should feel like. In: BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning. BMJ Publishing Group Limited. ISSN 2056-6697 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjstel-2018-aspihconf.39)

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Background:
Simulation in healthcare is mainly associated with clinical training and assessment needs. However, its uses can be much broader than is currently practiced. Recent applications have seen it be used for quality improvement projects, public and patient engagement and outreach, evaluation of new interventions, identification of latent safety threats, and the development of new models of care to name but a few. This short communication will present an unorthodox use of simulation that builds on this current trend and reveals its potential as more than just for training and assessment practices.

Summary of project:
This Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project aimed to observe instances of care in both clinical and dining settings through direct observations and field notes. Although these disciplines seem worlds apart at first glance, both require an element of anticipation. Whether it is waiting for premium food or an operation, both require the experience to be as good as the outcome. Collaborations were built between Heston Blumenthal’s three-Michelin star Fat Duck restaurant and a National Health Service (NHS) Trust. The principles of care identified at each site were abstracted and are to be re-presented to members of the public across the country through the medium of simulation. The simulations are designed to be immersive in nature and focus on a restaurant front-of-house and a day surgery unit. Real waiting staff and clinicians will undertake their roles incorporating the identified principles of care. Members of the public will be invited to be a patient and a diner in each simulation before participating in a wider discussion on the experience of care and if there is any transferrable learning between the settings.

Summary of results:
The initial observations revealed similarities in terms of expectation setting, however, differences were noted in terms of the visibility of the patient/diner. The simulation events are set to take place in June 2018 in London, Worcester, and Glasgow. Results from the discussions will be available in time for the conference.

Conclusions:
Simulation as a tool can be used to enable us to think differently about what care is and how we deliver it. This project has presented a unique way of capturing clinical care and working with different yet complimentary domains to present current approaches and generate wider discussions with members of the public.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Title of Proceedings: BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning
Additional Information: Abstracts of the Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare 9th Annual Conference, 13th to 15th November 2018, Southport Theatre and Convention Centre, UK: Short communications November 14, 2018, 16:00–17:20 pm.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Simulation, The Fat Duck, Restaurant, Care, Day surgery unit, qualitative, public engagement, communication
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2020 22:50
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/29929

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item