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The effect of self-reported lactose intolerance and dairy consumption on bone mineral density among American hip arthroplasty patients: A cross-sectional study

The effect of self-reported lactose intolerance and dairy consumption on bone mineral density among American hip arthroplasty patients: A cross-sectional study

Hamilton, Nikola K., Ojo, Omorogieva ORCID: 0000-0003-0071-3652 and Rodrigues Amorim Adegboye, Amanda ORCID: 0000-0003-2780-0350 (2020) The effect of self-reported lactose intolerance and dairy consumption on bone mineral density among American hip arthroplasty patients: A cross-sectional study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17:7182. ISSN 1660-4601 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197182)

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Abstract

The relationship between osteoporosis and lactose intolerance is unclear. This study aims to evaluate the association between self-reported lactose intolerance and symptom severity caused by lactose malabsorption and bone mineral density (BMD). A total of 496 American hip arthroplasty patients took part in this study. Information on BMD and socio-demographic factors were retrospectively extracted from medical records. BMD of the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck of the operative hip (FNOH), and femoral neck of the non-operative hip (FNH) were measured via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans (DXA). Patients also completed a survey regarding dietary and lifestyle habits from the time of surgery. We found that 9.3% of participants reported lactose intolerance and 33.3%% suffered from either osteopenia or osteoporosis in at least one (location. The population that did not self-identify as lactose intolerant consumed significantly more dairy (p < 0.0001) and animal protein (p = 0.004) than those with intolerance. There was no significant difference in BMD between self-identified lactose intolerant individuals and non-lactose intolerant individuals. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) and age were the only common predictors of BMD for all locations (p < 0.05). However, yogurt intake was a significant predictor of BMD of FNOH in the multivariate analysis. This study suggests that lactose intolerance is not associated with bone mineral density. We also found that being vegan or vegetarian may increase the risk of low BMD.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords: lactose intolerance; osteoporosis; bone mineral density; dairy intake
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Chronic Illness and Ageing
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2020 22:19
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/29872

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