Skip navigation

The impact of language and ethnicity on preparation for endoscopy: A prospective audit of an East London hospital ward

The impact of language and ethnicity on preparation for endoscopy: A prospective audit of an East London hospital ward

Essex, Ryan ORCID: 0000-0003-3497-3137, Cucos, Mihaela and Dibley, Lesley ORCID: 0000-0001-7964-7672 (2020) The impact of language and ethnicity on preparation for endoscopy: A prospective audit of an East London hospital ward. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 27 (4). pp. 877-884. ISSN 1356-1294 (Print), 1365-2753 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/jep.13490)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Open Access Article)
29852 ESSEX_The_Impact_of_Language_and_Ethnicity_on_Preparation_for_Endoscopy_(OA)_2020.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (2MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Author Accepted Manuscript)
29852 ESSEX_The_Impact_of_Language_and_Ethnicity_on_Preparation_for_Endoscopy_2020.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (462kB) | Preview

Abstract

Rationale, aims and objectives:
The efficacy, cost-effectiveness and safety of a number of endoscopic procedures is largely dependent on optimal preparation. Despite this however, inadequate or suboptimal preparation is relatively common. Most studies have revealed inadequate preparation for between 20-30% of patients. This audit sought to examine the impact of English language proficiency, and ethnicity, on endoscopic preparation and procedure success or failure

Method:
A prospective audit was developed. Using convenience sampling, participants were consecutive patients recruited over a six-month period, who were aged 18 and over, attending an east London endoscopy ward for a routine (pre-booked) endoscopy procedure for which they had received preparation instructions to carry out at home.

Results:
Almost one third of the sample had adequate or very poor English proficiency. When an interpreter was used it was overwhelmingly a member of the patients’ family or a member of staff. There was no significant relationship between gender, age, ethnic group, English language proficiency, whether an interpreter was needed, the type of procedure carried out and inadequate preparation

Conclusions:
Amongst these patients we found that a little more than 20% of participants were inadequately prepared for their endoscopic procedure. We found no relationship between language proficiency on preparation. Given the mixed literature on interventions to improve preparation before endoscopic procedures, further directions are identified to work toward the development and testing of a novel intervention amongst this population. In identifying those who may be at risk for inadequate preparation for endoscopic procedures, practice needs to take into account a range of factors beyond language and ethnicity. Furthermore, the persistent reliance on family members to interpret information sheets and preparation advice suggests that revision and / or development of culture and language-specific materials is necessary.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: endoscopy, gastroscopy, predictors, preparation, ethnicity, language
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Chronic Illness and Ageing
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2021 11:36
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/29852

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics