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South Indian cuisine with low glycemic index ingredients reduces cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes

South Indian cuisine with low glycemic index ingredients reduces cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes

Pavithran, Nivedita, Kumar, Harish, Menon, Arun Somasekharan, Pillai, Gopala Krishna, Sundaram, Karimassery Ramaiyer and Ojo, Omorogieva ORCID: 0000-0003-0071-3652 (2020) South Indian cuisine with low glycemic index ingredients reduces cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (17):6232. ISSN 1660-4601 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176232)

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Abstract

Background: Inflammation is considered as a predictor of cardiovascular diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus. No previous studies have investigated the effect of low glycemic index (LGI) recipes of South Indian cuisine on the risk factors of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Aim: The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the improvement in cardiovascular risk factors and blood glucose control, in patients with type 2 diabetes, after intervention with recipes of Kerala cuisine, from locally available whole grain cereals, low in glycemic index. Method: This was a prospective and randomized controlled study that was conducted over a period of 24 weeks. A total of 80 participants were recruited from the Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Outpatient in Kerala, South India. All 80 patients had type 2 diabetes, and were aged between 35 and 65 years. Participants were randomly assigned and advised to follow either a LGI diet plan (n = 40) or their usual diet, which served as a control group (n = 40). The advice was reinforced throughout the study period. Anthropometric, biochemical parameters which included glycemic and cardio-metabolic parameters were measured according to standard procedures. T-tests were conducted to compare the differences between intervention and control groups, and the Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate associations between the variables. Results: There were significant differences (p < 0.05) between the intervention and control groups with respect to weight, HbA1c, insulin, triglycerides, Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and apolipoprotein B (ApoB). There was also a positive correlation between weight and blood glucose variables. ApoB was positively correlated with lipid profile and insulin levels. Conclusions: The long-term implementation of LGI diet of Kerala cuisine has been found to promote weight loss, enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce the cardiovascular risk.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: low GI diet, south Indian (Kerala) cuisine, hs-CRP, HOMA-IR, ApoB, glycemic control
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Chronic Illness and Ageing
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2020 11:06
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/29615

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