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Social capital is associated with improved subjective well-being of older adults with chronic non-communicable disease in six low- and middle-income countries

Social capital is associated with improved subjective well-being of older adults with chronic non-communicable disease in six low- and middle-income countries

Christian, Aaron K. ORCID: 0000-0002-6025-9765, Sanuade, Olutobi Adekunle, Okyere, Michael Adu and Adjaye-Gbewonyo, Kafui ORCID: 0000-0002-8919-6518 (2020) Social capital is associated with improved subjective well-being of older adults with chronic non-communicable disease in six low- and middle-income countries. Globalization and Health, 16:2. ISSN 1744-8603 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12992-019-0538-y)

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Abstract

Background:
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasingly contributing to the morbidity and mortality burden of low and-middle income countries (LMIC). Social capital, particularly participation has been considered as a possible protective factor in the prevention and management of chronic conditions. It is also largely shown to have a negative effect on the well-being of patients. The current discourse on the well-being of individuals with NCDs is however focused more on a comparison with those with no NCDs without considering the difference between individuals with one chronic condition versus those with multiple chronic conditions (MCC).

Method and objective:
We employed a multinomial logit model to examine the effect of social capital, particularly social participation, on the subjective well-being (SWB) of older adults with single chronic condition and MCC in six LMIC.

Findings:
Social capital was associated with increased subjective well-being of adults in all the six countries. The positive association between social capital and subjective well-being was higher for those with a single chronic condition than those with multiple chronic conditions in India and South Africa. Conversely, an increase in the likelihood of having higher subjective well-being as social capital increased was greater for those with multiple chronic conditions compared to those with a single chronic condition in Ghana.

Discussion:
The findings suggest that improving the social capital of older adults with chronic diseases could potentially improve their subjective well-being. This study, therefore, provides valuable insights into potential social determinants of subjective well-being of older adults with chronic diseases in six different countries undergoing transition. Additional research is needed to determine if these factors do in fact have causal effects on SWB in these populations.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Uncontrolled Keywords: chronic non-communicable disease, social capital, older adults
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / School / Research Centre / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2021 13:09
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/29471

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