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Coupling the macroscale to the microscale in a spatiotemporal context to examine effects of spatial diffusion on disease transmission

Coupling the macroscale to the microscale in a spatiotemporal context to examine effects of spatial diffusion on disease transmission

Xiao, Yanni, Xiang, Changcheng, Cheke, Robert A. ORCID: 0000-0002-7437-1934 and Tang, Sanyi (2020) Coupling the macroscale to the microscale in a spatiotemporal context to examine effects of spatial diffusion on disease transmission. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 82:58. ISSN 0092-8240 (Print), 1522-9602 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11538-020-00736-9)

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Abstract

There are many challenges to coupling the macroscale to the microscale in temporal or spatial contexts. In order to examine effects of an individual movement and spatial control measures on a disease outbreak, we developed a multiscale model and extended the semi-stochastic simulation method by linking individual movements to pathogen’s diffusion, linking the slow dynamics for disease transmission at the population level to the fast dynamics for pathogen shedding/excretion at the individual level. Numerical simulations indicate that during a disease outbreak individuals with the same infection status show the property of clustering and, in particular, individuals’ rapid movements lead to an increase in the average reproduction number R0, the final size and the peak value of the outbreak. It is interesting that a high level of aggregation the individuals’ movement results in low new infections and a small final size of the infected population. Further, we obtained that either high diffusion rate of the pathogen or frequent environmental clearance lead to a decline in the total number of infected individuals, indicating the need for control measures such as improving air circulation or environmental hygiene. We found that the level of spatial heterogeneity when implementing control greatly affects the control efficacy, and in particular, an uniform isolation strategy leads to low a final size and small peak, compared with local measures, indicating that a large-scale isolation strategy with frequent clearance of the environment is beneficial for disease control.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: multiscale model, semi-stochastic simulation, outbreaks, threshold policy
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2020 13:42
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/28174

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