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Enhancing value chain innovation through collective action: Lessons from the Andes, Africa, and Asia

Enhancing value chain innovation through collective action: Lessons from the Andes, Africa, and Asia

Devaux, André, Velasco, Claudio, Ordinola, Miguel and Naziri, Diego ORCID: 0000-0002-8078-5033 (2019) Enhancing value chain innovation through collective action: Lessons from the Andes, Africa, and Asia. In: Campos, Hugo and Ortiz, Oscar, (eds.) The Potato Crop: Its Agricultural, Nutritional and Social Contribution to Humankind. Springer, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 75-106. ISBN 978-3030286828 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28683-5_3)

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Abstract

The development community has shown increasing interest in the potential of innovation systems and value chain development approaches for reducing poverty and stimulating greater gender equity in rural areas. Nevertheless, there is a shortage of systematic knowledge on how such approaches have been implemented in different contexts, the main challenges in their application, and how they can be scaled to enable large numbers of poor people to benefit from participation in value chains. This chapter provides an overview of value chain development and focuses on the International Potato Center’s experiences with the Participatory Market Chain Approach (PMCA), a flexible approach that brings together smallholder farmers, traders, processors, researchers, and other service providers in a collective process to explore potential business opportunities and develop innovations to exploit them. The PMCA is an exemplary case of South–South knowledge exchange: it was first developed and implemented in the Andes, but has since been introduced, adapted, and applied to different market chains in Africa and Asia, where it has contributed to improved rural livelihoods. The experiences of adjusting and implementing the approach in these different contexts and the outcomes of those interventions, and complementary approaches, are examined in this chapter. Lessons learned from these experiences are shared with a goal of informing the promotion, improvement, and scaling of value chain approaches in the future.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This chapter is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this chapter are included in the chapter’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the chapter’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Innovation, Value chains, Potato, Highlands, Participatory Market Chain Approach, Papa nativa, Marketing, Peru
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Development Studies Research Group
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Last Modified: 10 May 2020 00:08
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: REF 6
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/27927

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