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Spatial anticipatory attentional bias for threat: reliable individual differences with RT-based online measurement

Spatial anticipatory attentional bias for threat: reliable individual differences with RT-based online measurement

Gladwin, Thomas E. and Vink, Matthijs (2020) Spatial anticipatory attentional bias for threat: reliable individual differences with RT-based online measurement. Consciousness and Cognition, 81:102930. ISSN 1053-8100 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2020.102930)

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Abstract

Cues that predict the future location of emotional stimuli may evoke an anticipatory form of automatic attentional bias. The reliability of this bias towards threat is uncertain: experimental design may need to be optimized or individual differences may simply be relatively noisy in the general population. The current study therefore aimed to determine the split-half reliability of the bias, in a design with fewer factors and more trials than in previous work. A sample of 63 participants was used for analysis, who performed the cued Visual Probe Task online, which aims to measure an anticipatory attentional bias. The overall bias towards threat was tested and split-half reliability was calculated over even and odd blocks. Results showed a significant bias towards threat and a reliability of around 0.7. The results support systematic individual differences in anticipatory attentional bias and demonstrate that RT-based bias scores, with online data collection, can be reliable.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: attentional bias, dot-probe, reliability, cued visual probe task, threat
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Last Modified: 07 May 2020 09:08
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/27867

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