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Neighborhood physical food environment and cardiovascular risk factors in India: Cross-sectional evidence from APCAPS

Neighborhood physical food environment and cardiovascular risk factors in India: Cross-sectional evidence from APCAPS

Li, Yingjun, Mallinson, Poppy, Bhan, Nandita, Turner, Christopher ORCID: 0000-0002-8091-1108, Bhogadi, Santhi, Sharma, Chitra, Aggarwal, Aastha, Kulkarni, Bharathi and Kinra, Sanjay (2019) Neighborhood physical food environment and cardiovascular risk factors in India: Cross-sectional evidence from APCAPS. Environment International, 132:105108. ISSN 0160-4120 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.105108)

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Abstract

There has been increasing interest in associations between neighborhood food environments and cardiovascular risk factors. However, results from high-income countries remain inconsistent, and there has been limited re- search from low- and middle-income countries. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the third wave follow- up of the Andhra Pradesh children and parents study (APCAPS) (n = 5764, median age 28.8 years) in south India. We examined associations between the neighborhood availability (vendor density per km2 within 400 m and 1600 m buffers of households) and accessibility (distance from the household to the nearest vendor) of fruit/ vegetable and highly processed/take-away food vendors with 11 cardiovascular risk factors, including adiposity measures, glucose-insulin, blood pressure, and lipid profile. In fully adjusted models, higher density of fruit/ vegetable vendors within 400 m of participant households was associated with lower systolic blood pressure [−0.09 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.17, −0.02] and diastolic blood pressure (−0.10 mmHg, 95% CI: −0.17, −0.04). Higher density of highly processed/take-away food vendors within 400 m of participant households was associated with higher Body Mass Index (0.01 Kg/m2, 95% CI: 0.00, 0.01), waist circumference (0.22 mm, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.39), systolic blood pressure (0.03 mmHg, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.06), and diastolic blood pressure (0.03 mmHg, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.05). However, within 1600 m buffer, only association with blood pressure remained robust. No associations were found for between neighborhood accessibility and cardiovascular risk factors. Lower density of fruit/vegetable vendors, and higher density of highly processed/take-away food ven- dors were associated with adverse cardiovascular risk profiles. Public health policies regarding neighborhood food environments should be encouraged in south India and other rural communities in south Asia.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords: Food environment, Fruit and vegetable, Highly processed and take-away food, Cardiovascular risk factors, APCAPS
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2020 21:15
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/27695

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