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A pilot study of an integrated mental health, social and medical model for diabetes care in an inner‐city setting: three dimensions for diabetes (3DFD)

A pilot study of an integrated mental health, social and medical model for diabetes care in an inner‐city setting: three dimensions for diabetes (3DFD)

Ismail, K., Stewart, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-3730-9733, Ridge, K., Britneff, E., Freudenthal, R., Stahl, D., McCrone, P. ORCID: 0000-0001-7001-4502, Gayle, C. and Doherty, A. M. (2019) A pilot study of an integrated mental health, social and medical model for diabetes care in an inner‐city setting: three dimensions for diabetes (3DFD). Diabetic Medicine. ISSN 0742-3071 (Print), 1464-5491 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13918)

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Abstract

Aims
We examined the effectiveness of a service innovation, Three Dimensions for Diabetes (3DFD), that consisted of a referral to an integrated mental health, social care and diabetes treatment model, compared with usual care in improving biomedical and health economic outcomes.

Methods
Using a non‐randomized control design, the 3DFD model was offered in two inner‐city boroughs in London, UK, where diabetes health professionals could refer adult residents with diabetes, suboptimal glycaemic control [HbA1c ≥ 75 mmol/mol (≥ 9.0%)] and mental health and/or social problems. In the usual care group, there was no referral pathway and anonymized data on individuals with HbA1c ≥ 75 mmol/mol (≥ 9.0%) were collected from primary care records. Change in HbA1c from baseline to 12 months was the primary outcome, and change in healthcare costs and biomedical variables were secondary outcomes.

Results
3DFD participants had worse glycaemic control and higher healthcare costs than control participants at baseline. 3DFD participants had greater improvement in glycaemic control compared with control participants [−14 mmol/mol (−1.3%) vs. −6 mmol/mol (−0.6%) respectively, P < 0.001], adjusted for confounding. Total follow‐up healthcare costs remained higher in the 3DFD group compared with the control group (mean difference £1715, 95% confidence intervals 591 to 2811), adjusted for confounding. The incremental cost‐effectiveness ratio was £398 per mmol/mol unit decrease in HbA1c, indicating the 3DFD intervention was more effective and costed more than usual care.

Conclusions
A biomedical, psychological and social criteria‐based referral system for identifying and managing high‐cost and high‐risk individuals with poor glycaemic control can lead to improved health in all three dimensions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: diabetes, cost, economic evaluation
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Mental Health
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2020 12:11
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF 2020/1: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/27498

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