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Exploiting the mechanical bond for molecular recognition and sensing of charged species

Exploiting the mechanical bond for molecular recognition and sensing of charged species

Bąk, Krzysztof M., Porfyrakis, Kyriakos ORCID: 0000-0003-1364-0261, Davis, Jason J. and Beer, Paul D. (2019) Exploiting the mechanical bond for molecular recognition and sensing of charged species. Materials Chemistry Frontiers, 4 (4). pp. 1052-1073. ISSN 2052-1529 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1039/C9QM00698B)

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Abstract

The unique properties of the mechanical bond have been increasingly used for the purpose of molecular recognition. The recent progress in the development of cation and anion template strategies for the construction of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) have resulted in a variety of ion binding catenane and rotaxane host structures. The appropriate integration of reporting redox- and photo-active centres into their structural frameworks can result in prototype molecular sensors for targeting charged species and molecular switches for potential nanotechnological applications. This review presents progress in the field of MIM hosts for ion recognition and sensing since 2014, focusing on the synthetic approaches employed and mechanisms of host–guest binding and detection.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Molecular recognition, sensing, macrocycles, fullerenes
Subjects: T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Engineering Science
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2020 09:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/27494

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