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The interaction of rape myth acceptance and alcohol intoxication on bystander intervention

The interaction of rape myth acceptance and alcohol intoxication on bystander intervention

Jozkowski, Kristen N., Willis, Malachi ORCID: 0000-0002-3173-3990, Hurd, Lauren E., Ham, Lindsay S., Bridges, Ana J. and Wiersma-Mosley, Jacquelyn D. (2019) The interaction of rape myth acceptance and alcohol intoxication on bystander intervention. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. ISSN 0886-2605 (Print), 1552-6518 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260519863720)

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Abstract

Bystander interventions for sexual assault promote third-party interference. People who endorse rape myths blame victims more and perpetrators less; consequently, rape myth acceptance (RMA) can impede helping behaviors toward sexual assault victims. Acute alcohol intoxication may exacerbate the effects of RMA on bystander intervention. In this study, we examined the influence of RMA—and potential moderating effect of acute alcohol intoxication—on predictors of bystander intervention. Young adults (N = 128) completed a survey in a lab setting, then consumed either an alcoholic or control beverage, read and listened to a fictional sexual assault scenario, and finally completed a semi-structured interview and postexperiment survey assessing their perceptions of the scenario. Using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), we found people with higher RMA blamed the victim more and perpetrator less; they were also less likely to perceive responsibility to intervene for a sexual assault victim. Alcohol intoxication did not exacerbate these effects. That is, alcohol intoxication was not a context in which RMA was expressed more strongly. We recommend bystander programs continue to address RMA, specifically as a barrier to intervening.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: bystander intervention, rape myths, alcohol intoxication, sexual assault, rape
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Inequalities
Last Modified: 01 May 2020 12:59
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: REF 5
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/27370

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