Skip navigation

Lost in translation: collecting and coding data on social relations from audio-visual recordings

Lost in translation: collecting and coding data on social relations from audio-visual recordings

Pallotti, Francesca, Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265 and Lomi, Alessandro (2020) Lost in translation: collecting and coding data on social relations from audio-visual recordings. Social Networks. ISSN 0378-8733 (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socnet.2020.02.006)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Publisher's PDF - Open Access)
26945_PALLOTTI_Lost_in_Translation_(OA)_2020.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Some of the constitutive features of social relations are lost when information naturally produced by sequential social interaction is translated into network ties. Building on core concepts and ideas developed within conversation analysis, in this paper we argue that this happens because the sequential, multimodal and embodied character of social relations can be fully understood only with reference to the sequential constrains that are generated by – and at the same time shape the micro-dynamics of social interaction. We suggest that the translation of social interaction into social networks precludes analysis of the multiple interfaces that sustain social relations (multimodality), and the material resources around which social relations are organized (embodiment). We highlight audio-visual recording as a data collection technology that facilitates storage, retrieval, and analysis of complex information on social relations that is typically absent from social network data. An illustrative video supported case study based on the observation of social and task-related interaction among members of surgical teams provides the empirical context that supports and motivates our general reflection on network data collection strategies and technologies to study social interaction. The analysis highlights the need for social networks research to return to the study of social relations.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords: communication, social networks, operating theatre, operating room, surgical teams, coordination, interaction
Subjects: R Medicine > RD Surgery
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of International Business & Economics
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Professional Workforce Development
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2020 08:35
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: REF 4
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26945

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics