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Use of electricity and malaria occurrence: is there a link? The case of Malawi

Use of electricity and malaria occurrence: is there a link? The case of Malawi

Tasciotti, Luca ORCID: 0000-0003-2561-5530 (2016) Use of electricity and malaria occurrence: is there a link? The case of Malawi. Energy Policy, 101. pp. 310-316. ISSN 0301-4215 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2016.10.028)

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Abstract

Sub-Saharan countries are facing a number of similar challenges, including their need to increase electricity access for both urban and rural dwellers and to limit the cases of malaria related morbidity and mortality.

This study explores the link between using electricity, for either lighting or cooking purposes, and the occurrence of malaria cases using country-representative household level data for Malawi.

The descriptive statistics and the econometric results highlight the fact that those household members living in ‘electrified’ households are more likely to experience malaria. The interpretations behind those results can be diverse; as evidence suggests, malaria vectors are attracted by electric lights and outdoor lighting available after the sunset may change people habits and increases their exposure to those vectors.

This study aims at raising the attention to a nexus which has very rarely been studied theoretically and even less empirically, despite the fact that electricity projects are now in the agenda of several Sub-Saharan countries and that malaria still continue to constitute a major threat for an incredible high number of people, most of all children and pregnant women.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: electrification, malaria, household data, Malawi, household analysis
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of International Business & Economics
Last Modified: 12 Feb 2020 12:20
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26928

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