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Status and power do not modulate automatic imitation of intransitive hand movements

Status and power do not modulate automatic imitation of intransitive hand movements

Farmer, Harry ORCID: 0000-0002-3684-0605, Carr, Evan W., Svartdal, Marita, Winkielman, Piotr and Hamilton, Antonia F. de C. (2016) Status and power do not modulate automatic imitation of intransitive hand movements. PLoS ONE, 11 (4):e0151835. ISSN 1932-6203 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0151835)

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Abstract

The tendency to mimic the behaviour of others is affected by a variety of social factors, and it has been argued that such “mirroring” is often unconsciously deployed as a means of increasing affiliation during interpersonal interactions. However, the relationship between automatic motor imitation and status/power is currently unclear. This paper reports five experiments that investigated whether social status (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) or power (Experiments 4 and 5) had a moderating effect on automatic imitation (AI) in finger-movement tasks, using a series of different manipulations. Experiments 1 and 2 manipulated the social status of the observed person using an associative learning task. Experiment 3 manipulated social status via perceived competence at a simple computer game. Experiment 4 manipulated participants’ power (relative to the actors) in a card-choosing task. Finally, Experiment 5 primed participants using a writing task, to induce the sense of being powerful or powerless. No significant interactions were found between congruency and social status/power in any of the studies. Additionally, Bayesian hypothesis testing indicated that the null hypothesis should be favoured over the experimental hypothesis in all five studies. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for AI tasks, social effects on mimicry, and the hypothesis of mimicry as a strategic mechanism to promote affiliation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: automatic imitation, status, power, mimicry, priming
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2020 19:38
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: REF 6
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26817

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