Skip navigation

Intensity of environmental regulation and environmentally biased technology in the employment market

Intensity of environmental regulation and environmentally biased technology in the employment market

Song, Malin, Xie, Qianjiao, Wang, Shuhong and Zhou, Li ORCID: 0000-0001-7132-5935 (2020) Intensity of environmental regulation and environmentally biased technology in the employment market. Omega. ISSN 0305-0483 (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.omega.2020.102201)

[img] PDF (Author's Accepted Manuscript)
26800 ZHOU_Intensity_Of_Environmental_Regulation_And_Environmentally_Biased_Technology_(AAM)_2020.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 16 September 2021.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (360kB) | Request a copy
[img] PDF (Acceptance Email)
26800 ZHOU_Intensity_Of_Environmental_Regulation_And_Environmentally_Biased_Technology_(Email)_2020.pdf - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (501kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Due to the lack of an appropriate method to measure biased technological progress, the theory of how environmental regulations affect employment demand through biased technological progress in Porter’s hypothesis has not been effectively verified. To fill this gap, this study extends Acemoglu’s (2012) biased technological progress theory, and reasonably measures environmentally biased technological progress using data envelopment analysis. The effect of environmental regulation on labor supply and demand is analyzed through environmentally biased technological progress. The results show that progress in environmentally biased technology can promote the supply and demand of regional labor force. However, if the development of energy saving and emission reduction technology is inconsistent with economic growth, then progress in environmentally biased technology has a negative impact on the demand for regional labor. Environmental regulation has a significant negative impact on labor demand, but its self-adjusting mechanism reignites labor demand.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: environmental regulation, environmentally biased technology, employment, non-radial slack based measurement
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Systems Management & Strategy
Faculty of Business > Networks and Urban Systems Centre (NUSC)
Faculty of Business > Networks and Urban Systems Centre (NUSC) > Connected Cities Research Group
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2020 20:02
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: REF 5
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26800

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics