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Nutritional adequacy of meals from an independent catering facility versus chain restaurants for young adults

Nutritional adequacy of meals from an independent catering facility versus chain restaurants for young adults

Nikolaou, Charoula Konstantia ORCID: 0000-0001-6519-4174, Hankey, Catherine Ruth and Lean, Michael Ernest John (2017) Nutritional adequacy of meals from an independent catering facility versus chain restaurants for young adults. Nutrition and Health, 23 (1). pp. 51-56. ISSN 0260-1060 (Print), 2047-945X (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0260106016689564)

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Eating out of home has been associated with the increasing prevalence of obesity. While some chain restaurants provide nutritional information for their products, smaller independent catering facilities may not provide such information. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional adequacy of meals provided to young adults at an independent catering facility and compare them with meals provided by chain restaurants.

METHODS:
Meals were analysed in 2014 in the UK in relation of nutrient provision to targets for macro- and micro-nutrients. One-way ANOVA was performed to compare menus between the restaurants included in the analyses.

RESULTS:
2056 meal combinations were analysed, 210 from the student accommodation and 1,846 from five largest national chain restaurants. Mean (SD) nutritional content was: student accommodation: 1193(269)kcal, fat 52.0(22)g, saturated fat 24.5(14.5)g, protein 42.4(28.5)g, carbohydrate 117.0(30)g; chain restaurants: 922(160)kcal, fat 40.0(9.7)g, saturated fat 14.5(5.8)g, protein 31.2(6.5)g, carbohydrate 104.2(16.6)g. Meals from the student accommodation presented significantly more calories than the meals in all five chain restaurants ( p = 0.0015).

CONCLUSIONS:
Meal provision in the student accommodation was in excess of energy requirements and higher than the meals offered in chain restaurants. Regulating or setting nutritional standards for all places that provide food is essential as current food provision may favour unwanted weight gain and diet-related diseases.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: public health, catering, nutrition, obesity
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2020 13:26
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26587

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