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Automated pastures and the digital divide: how agricultural technologies are shaping labour and rural communities

Automated pastures and the digital divide: how agricultural technologies are shaping labour and rural communities

Rotz, Sarah, Gravely, Evan, Mosby, Ian, Duncan, Emily, Finnis, Elizabeth, Horgan, Mervyn, LeBlanc, Joseph, Martin, Ralph, Neufeld, Hannah Tait, Nixon, Andrew, Pant, Laxmi, Shalla, Vivian and Fraser, Evan (2019) Automated pastures and the digital divide: how agricultural technologies are shaping labour and rural communities. Journal of Rural Studies, 68. pp. 112-122. ISSN 0743-0167 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2019.01.023)

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Abstract

A “digital revolution” in agriculture is underway. Advanced technologies like sensors, artificial intelligence, and robotics are increasingly being promoted as a means to increase food production efficiency while minimizing resource use. In the process, agricultural digitalization raises critical social questions about the implications for diverse agricultural labourers and rural spaces as digitalization evolves. In this paper, we use literature and field data to outline some key trends being observed at the nexus of agricultural production, technology, and labour in North America, with a particular focus on the Canadian context. Using the data, we highlight three key tensions observed: rising land costs and automation; the development of a high-skill/low-skilled bifurcated labour market; and issues around the control of digital data. With these tensions in mind, we use a social justice lens to consider the potential implications of digital agricultural technologies for farm labour and rural communities, which directs our attention to racial exploitation in agricultural labour specifically. In exploring these tensions, we argue that policy and research must further examine how to shift the trajectory of digitalization in ways that support food production as well as marginalized agricultural labourers, while pointing to key areas for future research—which is lacking to date. We emphasize that the current enthusiasm for digital agriculture should not blind us to the specific ways that new technologies intensify exploitation and deepen both labour and spatial marginalization.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: digital agriculture, North America, automation, migrant labour, rural development, critical theory
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Livelihoods & Institutions Department
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2020 16:23
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26562

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