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Supporting recovery in patients with psychosis through care by community-based adult mental health teams (REFOCUS): a multisite, cluster, randomised, controlled trial

Supporting recovery in patients with psychosis through care by community-based adult mental health teams (REFOCUS): a multisite, cluster, randomised, controlled trial

Slade, Mike, Bird, Victoria, Clarke, Eleanor, Le Boutillier, Clair, Mccrone, Paul ORCID: 0000-0001-7001-4502, Macpherson, Rob, Pesola, Francesca, Wallace, Genevieve, Williams, Julie and Leamy, Mary (2015) Supporting recovery in patients with psychosis through care by community-based adult mental health teams (REFOCUS): a multisite, cluster, randomised, controlled trial. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2 (6). pp. 503-514. ISSN 2215-0366 (Print), 2215-0374 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00086-3)

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Abstract

Background:
Mental health policy in many countries is oriented around recovery. The evidence base for service-level pro-recovery interventions is lacking.

Methods:
Two-site cluster randomised controlled trial in England (ISRCTN02507940). REFOCUS is a one-year team-level intervention targeting staff behaviour (increasing focus on patient values, preferences, strengths, goal-striving) and staff-patient relationships (coaching, partnership). 27 community-based adult mental health teams were randomly allocated to treatment-as-usual (n=13) or treatment-as-usual plus REFOCUS (n=14). Baseline (n=403) and one-year follow-up (n=297) outcomes were assessed for randomly selected patients with psychosis, representing 88% of target recruitment. Primary outcome was recovery, assessed using Questionnaire about Processes of Recovery (QPR).

Findings:
Intention-to-treat analysis using multiple imputation found no difference in QPR Total (control 40·0 (s.d.10·2), intervention 40·6 (s.d.10·1), adjusted difference 0·68, 95%CI: 1·7 to 3·1, p=·58), or sub-scales. Secondary outcomes which improved in the intervention group were functioning (adjusted difference 6·96, 95%CI 2·8 to 9·2, p<·001) and staff-rated unmet need (adjusted difference 0·80, 95%CI 0·2 to 1·4, p=·01). This pattern remained after covariate adjustment and completer analysis (n=275). Higherparticipating teams had higher staff-rated pro-recovery behaviour change (adjusted difference -0·4, 95%CI -0·7 to -0·2, p=·001) and patients had higher QPR Interpersonal scores (adjusted difference -1·6, 95%CI -2·7 to -0·5, p=·005) at follow-up. Interventiongroup patients incurred £1,062 (95%CI -£1,103 to £3,017) lower adjusted costs.

Interpretation:
Supporting recovery may, from the staff perspective, improve functioning and reduce needs. Overcoming implementation barriers may increase staff pro-recovery behaviours and interpersonal aspects of patient-rated recovery.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: psychosis, recovery, trial, costs, economic evaluation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2020 09:57
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26354

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