Skip navigation

“There are things I want to say but you do not ask”: a comparison between standardised and individualised evaluations in substance use treatment

“There are things I want to say but you do not ask”: a comparison between standardised and individualised evaluations in substance use treatment

Gomes Alves, Paula Cristina ORCID: 0000-0002-1406-5724, Sales, Célia Maria Dias, Ashworth, Mark and Faísca, Luís (2018) “There are things I want to say but you do not ask”: a comparison between standardised and individualised evaluations in substance use treatment. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. ISSN 1557-1874 (Print), 1557-1882 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-018-9985-6)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Publisher's PDF - Open Access)
26220 ALVES_There_Are_Things_I_Want_to_Say_But_You_Do_Not_Ask_(OA)_2018.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (543kB) | Preview

Abstract

There has been an increasing call for service users to be more actively involved with the evaluation of treatment outcomes. One strategy to impove such involvement is to ask service users to contribute with their own criteria for evaluation by sharing their personal story and perspective about their clinical situation. In this cross-sectional study, we contrasted the contents elicited by service users completing two individualised measures against the contents of three widely used standardised measures. We also compared two methods to generate individualised data using self-report and interview-based instruments (PSYCHLOPS and PQ). Following a thematic comparison approach, we found that one quarter of the problems reported by patients in individualised measures were not covered by any of our standardised comparators. Also, half of our sample generated at least one problem whose theme was not covered by any of the three standardised measures. We also found that patients in this population have many other concerns beyond drug use. These included psychological (e.g. interpersonal relationships) and socio-economic (e.g. money) problems, which were frequently reported. Our study suggests that listening to service users’ stories allows us to capture issues of importance to service users in substance use treatment, which may be underestimated by standardised measures.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2018. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Personalised assessment, Standardised measures, Individualised measures, Substance use treatment evaluation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 18 May 2020 18:08
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: REF 2
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26220

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics