Skip navigation

Certify or not? An analysis of organic food supply chain with competing suppliers

Certify or not? An analysis of organic food supply chain with competing suppliers

Yu, Yanan, He, Yong, Xuan, Zhao and Zhou, Li ORCID: 0000-0001-7132-5935 (2019) Certify or not? An analysis of organic food supply chain with competing suppliers. Annals of Operations Research. ISSN 0254-5330 (Print), 1572-9338 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10479-019-03465-y)

[img] PDF (Author's Accepted Manuscript)
26137 ZHOU_Certify_Or_Not_An_Analysis_Of_Organic_Food_Supply_Chain_With_Competing_Suppliers_(AAM)_2019.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 23 November 2020.

Download (508kB) | Request a copy
[img] PDF (Acceptance Email)
26137 ZHOU_Certify_Or_Not_An_Analysis_Of_Organic_Food_Supply_Chain_With_Competing_Suppliers_(Email)_2019.pdf - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (46kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Customers expect companies to provide clear health-related information for the products they purchase in a big data environment. Organic food is data-enabled with the organic label, but the certification cost discourages small-scale suppliers from certifying their product. This lack of a label means that product that satisfies the organic standard is regarded as conventional product. By considering the trade-off between the profit gained from organic label and additional costs of certification, this paper investigates an organic food supply chain where a leading retailer procures from two suppliers with different brands. Customers care about both the brand-value and quality (more specifically, if food is organic or not) when purchasing the product. We explore the organic certification and wholesale pricing strategies for suppliers, and the supplier selection and retail pricing strategies for the retailer. We find that when two suppliers adopt asymmetric certification strategy, the retailer tends to procure the product with organic label. The supplier without a brand name can compensate with organic certification, which leads to more profits than the branded rival. As the risk of being abandoned by the retailer increases, the supplier without a brand name is more eager than the rival to obtain the organic label. If both suppliers certify the product, however, they will fall into a prisoner’s dilemma under situation with low health utility from organic label and high certification cost.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: organic certification, pricing, competing suppliers, food supply chain
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Systems Management & Strategy
Faculty of Business > Networks and Urban Systems Centre (NUSC)
Faculty of Business > Networks and Urban Systems Centre (NUSC) > Connected Cities Research Group
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2019 11:34
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26137

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics