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Boosting human learning by hypnosis

Boosting human learning by hypnosis

Nemeth, Dezso, Janacsek, Karolina, Polner, Bertalan and Kovacs, Zoltan Ambrus (2012) Boosting human learning by hypnosis. Cerebral Cortex, 23 (4). pp. 801-805. ISSN 1047-3211 (Print), 1460-2199 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhs068)

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Abstract

Human learning and memory depend on multiple cognitive systems related to dissociable brain structures. These systems interact not only in cooperative but sometimes competitive ways in optimizing performance. Previous studies showed that manipulations reducing the engagement of frontal lobe-mediated explicit, attentional processes could lead to improved performance in striatum-related procedural learning. In our study, hypnosis was used as a tool to reduce the competition between these two systems. We compared learning in hypnosis and in the alert state and found that hypnosis boosted striatum-dependent sequence learning. Since frontal lobe-dependent processes are primarily affected by hypnosis, this finding could be attributed to the disruption of the explicit, attentional processes. Our result sheds light not only on the competitive nature of brain systems in cognitive processes, but also could have important implications for training and rehabilitation programs, especially for developing new methods to improve human learning and memory performance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: functional connectivity, hypnosis, memory systems, prefrontal cortex, sequence learning, striatum
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2020 12:35
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/25689

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