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Prevention of intention invention in the affect misattribution procedure

Prevention of intention invention in the affect misattribution procedure

Gawronski, Bertram and Ye, Yang ORCID: 0000-0001-7142-3869 (2014) Prevention of intention invention in the affect misattribution procedure. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 6 (1). pp. 101-108. ISSN 1948-5506 (Print), 1948-5514 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/1948550614543029)

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Abstract

The affect misattribution procedure (AMP) is one of the most promising indirect measures, showing high reliability and large effect sizes. However, the AMP has recently been criticized for being susceptible to explicit influences, in that priming effects tend to be larger and more reliable among participants who report that they intentionally responded to the primes instead of the targets. Consistent with interpretations of these effects in terms of retrospective confabulation, two experiments obtained reliable priming effects when (a) participants lacked meta-cognitive knowledge about their responses to the primes and (b) participants’ attention was directed away from response-eliciting features of the primes. Under either of these conditions, priming effects were unrelated to self-reported intentionality, although self-reported intentionality was positively related to priming effects under control conditions. The findings highlight the contribution of meta-cognitive inferences to retrospective self-reports of intentionality and suggest an effective procedure to rule out explicit influences in the AMP.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: affective misattribution, affective priming, awareness, implicit measures, intentionality
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2019 12:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/25117

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