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Validating the semantic misattribution procedure as an implicit measure of gender stereotyping: gender stereotyping

Validating the semantic misattribution procedure as an implicit measure of gender stereotyping: gender stereotyping

Ye, Yang ORCID: 0000-0001-7142-3869 and Gawronski, Bertram (2017) Validating the semantic misattribution procedure as an implicit measure of gender stereotyping: gender stereotyping. European Journal of Social Psychology, 48 (3). pp. 348-364. ISSN 0046-2772 (Print), 1099-0992 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2337)

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Abstract

The current research tested the validity of the semantic misattribution procedure (SMP)—a variant of the affect misattribution procedure—as an implicit measure of gender stereotyping. In three studies (N = 604), prime words of gender-stereotypical occupations (e.g., nurse, doctor) influenced participants’ guesses of whether unknown Chinese ideographs referred to male or female names in a stereotype-congruent manner. Priming scores of gender stereotyping showed high internal consistency and construct-valid correlations with explicit measures of sexism. Discriminant validity of gender stereotyping scores was tested by investigating relations with priming effects involving grammatical gender (e.g., mother, father). Evidence for discriminant validity was obtained when (1) trials from the two priming measures were presented in a blocked rather than interspersed manner and (2) the measure of stereotypical gender priming preceded the measure of grammatical gender priming. Overall, the SMP showed good psychometric properties and construct validity for the assessment of gender stereotyping.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: gender stereotyping, implicit measures, misattribution, sexism, validity
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2019 10:40
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/25109

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